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Faculty Summer Professional Development: 2019 Summer PD

Faculty Summer Reading for 2019

This year, everyone will read the same author.

What your colleagues are saying about these books:

I like how the author of Dive into Inquiry presents a model of different levels of inquiry, from very structured teacher led examples to free inquiry, where students have much more control. I appreciate that he does not expect that all learning should be at the free inquiry end of the spectrum, but instead explores how the other levels of inquiry are necessary to provide students with the tools and comfort to be ready for more open ended work. He also gives lots of ideas for how teachers can jump right in and experiment with inquiry based learning. —Kathy Johnson, Upper School, Dean of Teaching & Learning and Upper School Math Teacher

Dive Into Inquiry's 'handbook' format is most readable and useful. Its sections and links, which include lesson examples, provide a clear map of the continuum of the types of inquiry based learning, making the process of shifting curriculum approaches feel right, efficient, and logical. —Martha Richardson, Hamilton School. 8th Grade Teacher

Inquiry Mindset is a how-to guide for teachers to gain insight into different types of inquiry based learning that can readily be put into practice. It is an easy read filled with ideas that will inspire teachers to rethink traditional teaching methods and engage students in active learning experiences by posing questions and investigating answers. —Michelle Dolan, Lower School Nursery Teacher

There is a bit of theory in Trevor Mackenzie's book but what makes this a valuable resource is his relatable narrative about his classroom journey from structured to open inquiry. He combines appealing visuals and practical ideas to help answer teacher questions and wonderings about how to establish a "culture of inquiry" in their classroom. —Christine Smith, Middle School Librarian and Library Department Head

Questions to Consider

"Inquiry is the dynamic process of being open to wonder and puzzlements and coming to know and understand the world"  --Alberta Learning, Focus on Inquiry, 2004

 

Author Trevor MacKenzie divides student inquiry work into four types based on how much scaffolding teacher provide to students. Take a look at the four Types of Student Inquiry shown:

  • Where do you already find examples of these types of student inquiry in your division or department?
MacKenzie says, "Students should feel connected to their learning, certain about how to plan for their inquiry, and comfortable with its responsibility."
  • What does this statement mean to you?
  • How can it serve as a guide to our development of inquiry-based learning?

Mark passages with symbols or colored post-its...
  What project or idea in the book most excites you?

  What ideas could you implement right away?

  What ideas from this book would you like to develop with some help?

 

Think about connecting to others

  • Who is a teacher on campus who does this work and could be a thought partner for you?
  • Do you know educators at other schools doing this work right now?
  • Is there a division or department with whom you might collaborate?

Bigger questions

  • In what ways does inquiry-based teaching and learning connect with our new mission statement?
  • What other ways can we bring authenticity to student's learning?

Using Trevor MacKenzie's Four Pillars of Inquiry above as a guide, go to our summer reading LiveBinder online resources. (Click here)

Browse the binder by clicking on the various tabs and subtabs.

Find TWO resources in the binder that really speak to you:

  • One that allows you to explore a passion or delve into something you are curious about. (Pillars 1&3)
  • Find another the represents a teaching goal or a new challenge that you are ready to take on. (Pillars 2&4)

Be prepared to share about what you found in the binder that resonated with you when we meet in small groups at our opening meeting.

Special thanks to Alyssa Mroz for creating these questions.

Visit the LiveBinder

Using Trevor MacKenzie's Four Pillars of Inquiry as a guide, browse our summer reading LiveBinder resources (below) by clicking on the various tabs and subtabs.

Find TWO resources in the binder that really speak to you:

  • One that allows you to explore a passion or delve into something you are curious about. (Pillars 1&3)
  • Find another the represents a teaching goal or a new challenge that you are ready to take on. (Pillars 2&4)

Be prepared to share about what you found in the binder that resonated with you when we meet in small groups at our opening meeting.


Click here to open this binder in a new window.